Seminary & Graduate Student Loans

Understanding Student Loans

Because grants and scholarships are limited, many students must rely on loans to cover at least some portion of college costs. Graduate students may borrow money for education. In fact, approximately 80% of Capital’s aid recipients borrow educational loans.

The following steps represent borrowing options, beginning with the best value and proceeding to other, less favorable loan options based on interest rates, loan terms and conditions, and repayment options. These loan options may be used alone or in combination with each other.

We are committed to providing students and their families with the best information regarding student borrowing.  For that reason, we have adopted a Student Lending Code of Conduct.

Federal Direct Loans

A federal loan program which is available to all students.

Federal direct loans are available to eligible students who complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). This federal student aid is made available through the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program to help pay for educational expenses. The financial aid office awards a Direct Subsidized or Direct Unsubsidized Loan, or a combination of both loans, based on financial need.

The information you report on your FAFSA is used to determine your Expected Family Contribution (EFC), which is a calculated formula established by law. Your EFC is not equal to the amount you and your family must pay, but rather an index that allows colleges to determine financial need. To determine your financial need, your EFC is subtracted from your cost of attendance.